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Out of Hours

Evening and Weekend GP Appointments

Evening and weekend appointments are available by contacting Camden GP HUB

Appointments can be booked by calling the GP Hub team directly 020 7391 9979, or you can call the surgery during opening times.

You will need to give consent to have medical records shared, this will allow the doctor you are going to see the information on our system so they can better help you.

If you do need to cancel an appointment please call us or 020 7391 9979 to cancel it.

NHS 111

If you need urgent medical attention but it's not a life-threatening situation, you should first call 111. If you think life is at risk, you should call 999.

NHS 111 will assess you and give you the option to speak to a nurse, doctor or paramedic if appropriate. You'll then be advised where you need to go for treatment.

This could be an urgent treatment centre, an out-of-hours GP service, your local GP in normal hours, or the nearest A&E if necessary.

Urgent Care Centres (walk-in centre or minor injury unit)

Urgent treatment centres are a facility you can go to if you need urgent medical attention but it's not a life-threatening situation.

At the moment, the NHS offers a mix of walk-in centres, urgent care centres, minor injury units and urgent treatment centres, all with different levels of service.

Conditions that can be treated at an urgent treatment centre include:

  • sprains and strains
  • suspected broken limbs
  • minor head injuries
  • cuts and grazes
  • bites and stings
  • minor scalds and burns
  • ear and throat infections
  • skin infections and rashes
  • eye problems
  • coughs and colds
  • feverish illness in adults
  • feverish illness in children
  • abdominal pain
  • vomiting and diarrhoea
  • emergency contraception

Find a local urgent care service near you

When to call 999

At some point, most people will either witness or be involved in an accident or experience a medical emergency.

Knowing what to do next and who to call can potentially save lives.

Call 999 immediately if you or someone else is having a heart attack or stroke. Every second counts with these conditions.

Also call 999 if you think someone has had a major trauma, such as after a serious road traffic accident, a stabbing, a shooting, a fall from height, or a serious head injury.

Life-threatening emergencies

Call 999 in a medical emergency. This is when someone is seriously ill or injured and their life is at risk.

When to go to A&E

An A&E department (also known as emergency department or casualty) deals with genuine life-threatening emergencies, such as:

Less severe injuries can be treated in urgent care centres or minor injuries units. A&E is not an alternative to a GP appointment.

If your GP is closed you can go to 111.nhs.uk or call 111, which will direct you to the best local service.

Alternatively, you can visit an NHS urgent treatment or walk-in centre, which will also treat minor illnesses without an appointment.

How to find your nearest A&E

Not all hospitals have an A&E department. You can use the find services search on this site to see if there is one near you.

Find your nearest A&E

Alternatively, many hospitals have their own website and generally describe the urgent and emergency care services they offer.

If you dialled 999 for an ambulance and you have to be taken to hospital, then the ambulance team will take you to the most appropriate A&E – this may not be the closest. Find out more about making 999 emergency calls.

Call 111 when you need medical help fast but it’s not a 999 emergencyNHS ChoicesThis site is brought to you by My Surgery Website